Posts Tagged “fruit imports”

U.S. Vegetable Imports Jump While Fruits Decline Slightly

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Vegetable imports notched a 10 percent increase, while ottal fruit imports to the U.S. fell by 2 percent in the first half of the year, recently released USDA data shows.

The drop in fruit imports to the US was driven by a 19 percent drop in fruit juices and a 1 percent dip in fresh deciduous imports to the U.S. Fresh citrus imports fell by 1 percent to the US. The predominant ‘other’ fresh fruit category – which includes avocados, bananas and berries – saw no change, holding steady from January through June.

Avocado imports fell by 3 percent during the period, while bananas rose by 1 percent and blueberries fell by 17 percent and strawberries declined by 6 percent. Table grape imports through mid-February were up 35 percent, following by a 9 percent rise through the end of March, and then a 17 percent drop in the next three months.

Apples were down 22 percent, while limes were down 13 percent, mandarins were up 42 percent and oranges were up 19 percent.

Meanwhile, the total vegetable category was up 10 percent, driven by a 10 percent increase in imports of fresh vegetables excluding potatoes. Frozen vegetables were up 8 percent, while prepared or preserved vegetables rose by 15 percent. Potatoes notched a 38 percent uptick.

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Port of Virginia Planning Increase in South American Fruit Imports

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An increase in fruit imports of South America fruit is expected by The Port of Virginia due to the recent completion of the USDA’s Southeast In-Transit Cold Treatment Pilot program.

“We’re the U.S. East Coast’s leading vegetable exporter, and this designation positions us to achieve the same success with imported fruit,” John Reinhart, CEO and executive director of the Virginia Port Authority, said in a news release. “This is important for logistics and supply chain managers importing agricultural products because it means this cargo will get to its market more quickly.”

Through the USDA program, which the port joined in October 2017, refrigerated fruit from South America can enter the port. The program includes containers of blueberries, citrus and grapes from Peru; blueberries and grapes from Uruguay; and apples, blueberries and pears from Argentina, according to the release.


The program allows South American fruit to enter more ports in the U.S., following a two-week cold treatment process to guard against pests. Before the program started in 2013, fruit from certain export markets were limited to Northeast ports, according to the release. From there, they were distributed to southern states.

The new port of entry will cut transportation costs and increase fruit shelf life, according to the release.

Other participants in the USDA program include ports in Wilmington, N.C.; Charleston, S.C.; Port Everglades, Fla.; Palmetto, Fla., Jacksonville, Fla.; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; and Savannah, Ga.

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Imports: Peruvian Grapes to Bounce Back; Drop in South African Fruit Imports is Seen

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GrapesSAPeruvian table grapes at the start season earlier this year was delayed due the effects of El Nino, but a comeback is seen…..From South Africa, fruit imports are expected to be less.

While Peruvian grape exports declined about 10 percent due to the weather, the country is expected to rebound.  Table grapes are Peru’s number one agricultural export, and it is estimated the country’s 2017-18 production to be 638,000 metric tons, compared to 605,000 metric tons the past season. Exports are forecast at 380,000 metric tons, a jump from the 300,000 metric tons in 2016-17 season.

Rising demand, better yielding varieties and more acreage are the primary reason for increasing volume.

The U.S. is the largest import market for Peruvian grapes, followed by the Netherlands and China.

 South African Imports

Drought and low water levels in reservoirs in the Western Cape region of South Africa are expected to cut exports for the 2017-18 season.

The Western Cape region accounts for the biggest volume of deciduous fruits in South Africa, though the Northern Cape, Eastern Cape, and Limpopo provinces have gained in importance in the last two decades.

Grape Shipments

South African table grape exports for the 2017-18 season will drop 15 percent to 258,000 metric tons, due to a decrease in area harvested and small fruit size in the Western Cape growing areas.  However, normal production and growing conditions are expected in the Orange River growing regions.

South African grapes typically are shipped from October to May, with the first grapes coming from the Northern Cape Region and the season ending with the Hex River Valley.  The U.S. and Canadian markets have increased imports of South African grapes the past few years, but still accounted for only 3 percent of total exports last season. The European Union takes about 75 percent of South Africa’s fresh grape exports.

Apples and pears

2017-18 apple exports from South Africa are forecast to decline 5 percent to 500,000 metric tons due to reduced harvest area, smaller fruit size and limited irrigation water.  Africa takes about 40 percent of South Africa’s apple exports, followed by the European Union with 30 percent and Asia with 19 percent.  Only light volumes are shipped to the U.S.

Meanwhile, South Africa pear exports in 2017-18 are projected at 250,000 metric tons, down 3 percent from the previous year. About half of South Africa’s pear exports are shipped to Europe, with typically about 1,000 metric tons or less destined to the U.S. market.

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Fresh Produce Imports are Expected to Outpace exports

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DSCN3254+1With the USDA forecasting imports into the United States will exceed exports, that is good news for produce haulers.  Imported produce continues to grow, especially during the winter months.  U.S. ports, particularly in the Southeastern USA are handling more imported fresh perishables than ever.

The USDA is projecting stronger growth for U.S. imports of fresh fruits and vegetables.  Fresh fruit imports in FY 2015 will total $10.3 billion, 8.9 percent higher than 2014 and 23 percent above fiscal year 2013.  Fresh vegetable imports are forecast at $7.1 billion in 2015, 7 percent above FY 2014 and 8 percent above fiscal year 2013. The top imported fresh commodity in 2014 was Mexican tomatoes at $1.6 billion, 1 percent  above 2013. U.S. imports of Mexican avocados surged in value in 2014, rising from $920 million to $1.23 billion.

U.S. imports of fruits and vegetables will continue to outpace exports.  U.S. fresh fruit and vegetable exports will reach $7.9 billion in fiscal year 2015.  Strong exports of fresh fruits and vegetables will help total U.S. horticultural exports reach record levels. At $7.9 billion, fresh fruit and vegetable exports for fiscal year 2015 (October 2014 through September 2015) are forecast 6.4 percent ahead of fiscal year 2014’s total of $7.42 billion.

The U.S. exported $600 million in fresh berries to Canada in FY 2014, representing the biggest commodity export value to any country.  U.S. berry exports to Canada were 2 percent down from 2013,  but 5 percent above 2012.  U.S. exports of lettuce to Canada topped $400 million, and both grapes and apples tallied more than $200 million in export sales to Canada.  The top export to Mexico was apples at $257 million, down about 25 percent compared with 2013.

Imports from distribution centers near South Florida ports – grossing about $2300 to Chicago.

 

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Chilean Fruit Imports, Plus a Larger View of Produce Imports/Exports

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DSCN4931Chilean grape loadings should be up, while Chilean avocado loadings should be down this season at U.S. ports.  On a larger scale, U.S. imports and exports of fresh produce are increasing.

The first Chilean grape shipments were launched last week and should arrive by boat at Philadelphia in time for distribution prior to Christmas.  Last season Chile exported about 10 million cartons of grapes to the United States.  This season the initial report pegged the season total to be in the 11 million to 11.5 million carton range.

Chile’s avocado export volumes could take a tumble this season, in part due to the ongoing drought.  As a result the country may  only ship half the amount of fruit it did last season, or potentially just over a third.

The drought is drastically affecting avocados, mainly in the Valparaiso region where about 75 percent of national production is located.

Looking beyond just imports from Chile, the USDA predicts fresh produce imports will outpace exports.   U.S. fresh produce exports will reach $7.9 billion in fiscal year 2015.

Strong exports of fresh fruits and vegetables will help total U.S. horticultural exports reach record levels.  At $7.9 billion, fresh fruit and vegetable exports for fiscal year 2015 (October 2014 through September 2015) are forecast 6.4 percent ahead of fiscal year 2014’s total of $7.42 billion.  The U.S. exported $600 million in fresh berries to Canada in FY 2014, representing the biggest commodity export value to any country.  U.S. berry exports to Canada were 2 percent down from 2013 but 5 percent above 2012. U.S. exports of lettuce to Canada topped $400 million, and both grapes and apples tallied more than $200 million in export sales to Canada. The top export to Mexico was apples at $257 million, down about 25 percent compared with 2013.

The USDA is projecting even stronger growth for U.S. imports of fresh fruits and vegetables.  Fresh fruit imports in FY 2015 will total $10.3 billion, 8.9 percent higher than 2014 and 23 percent above fiscal year 2013.  Fresh vegetable imports are forecast at $7.1 billion in 2015, 7 percent above FY 2014 and 8 percent above fiscal year 2013.

The top imported fresh commodity in 2014 was Mexican tomatoes at $1.6 billion, 1 percent above 2013.  U.S. imports of Mexican avocados surged in value in 2014, rising from $920 million to $1.23 billion.

Mexican tomatoes and other vegetables crossing at Nogales, AZ – grossing about $6800 to New York City.
Mexican avocados and other tropical fruit, plus Rio Grande Valley, Tx citrus – grossing about $2800 to Chicago.

 

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