Posts Tagged “Hunts Point”

Hunt Points’ D’Arrigo Acquires Facility off of the Wholesale Market

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DSCN4979D’Arrigo Bros. Co. of New York, Inc., one of the nation’s largest wholesale produce distributors, has implemented a number of renovations and rebrands, plus a whole new side of business designed to take its operations to the next level.

Last January, the company purchased the John Georgallas Banana Distributors of New York, a company located just outside the Hunts Point Terminal Market and across the street.  Georgallas was a long time banana company.  Since the acquisition, D’Arrigo has been making major renovations of the facility.  There are currently 13 ripening rooms providing space on-site for both organic and conventional bananas.  Besides the ripening rooms for the bananas, there are two more rooms for plantains.

The changes are now allowing D’Arrigo  to accelerate the growth its tropical department which was launched several years ago.  With the acquired facility outside of the Hunts Point market, D’Arrigo now has more flexibility when handling product.  At the Hunts Point Terminal Market’s cooperative, vendors can only sell fresh fruits and vegetables, while with D’Arrigo’s new operation just outside of the Hunts Point market, it can sell other products such as teas, juices or packets.  D’Arrigo can now have the outside facility open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.   This move has changed D’Arrigo’s business model, allowing it to compete with other markets that have those capabilities.

D’Arrigo also has constructed new stalls in its wholesale facility, which was accomplished in phases.  This started with its fruit department and eventually included the company’s vegetable and other departments.  It resulted in the first major facelift in many years.

These renovations will result in the company having an additional 25,000 to 30,000 square feet of space.

The final stage of the construction will be coming this fall with the addition of new sales booths.  This construction will allow the company to become more efficient.

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Hunts Point, NYC Enter into Talks on Construction

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dscn4955Once again tenants at the Hunts Point Wholesale Produce Terminal are talking with the New York City about construction of entirely new warehouses to accommodate the market’s growing space needs.

A previous $400 million plan has been eliminated that would have added capacity on the city-owned site — while keeping about 1 million square feet of existing warehouses.  More recent negotiations with the NYC’s Economic Development Corp. focus on new buildings being constructed in stages.  Each of members of the 38-member cooperative would have the old warehouses torn down.

Strict standards for water and soil testing are now in place from new FDA safety regulations.    The regulations require labels identifying the originating farm on every food box.

The 113-acre market, which sits on a peninsula between the South Bronx and East rivers, is the world’s largest supplier of fresh fruits and vegetables.  It serves the region’s wholesale and retail businesses, including supermarkets, produce stands and mom-and-pop stores.

The co-op merchants have long complained about the site’s shortcomings — cramped quarters and vehicle congestion.  At one point Hunts Point wholesalers threatened to pull up stakes and move to New Jersey.

Food both arriving and departing the market is handled by air, rail and truck. T here are 13 miles of interior rail track along with 120,000 tractor-trailers and a million buyers with small vans and trucks all types vying for space.

Because there is not enough cold storage in the warehouses, hundreds of parked refrigerated trailers operate on the market’s fenced-in site.  These trailers run primarily on diesel fuel contributing to pollution.

Another problem is Hunts Point lacks the electrical capacity to support the infrastructure.

The city is reported to be working with the market to fund $10.5 million worth of capital improvement projects over a seven-year period, including lighting and electrical upgrades.

Additionally, $8.5 million in city capital has been committed for rail upgrades.  The city also will be working with the market on the long-term redevelopment plan.

Even so, a new facility will almost certainly cost more to develop than the plan fleshed out just a few years ago, when the co-op owners balked at sharing half the cost.

Hunts Point is in the last five years of the seven-year lease option with NYC.

 

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Hunts Point Market isn’t Moving Anywhere

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DSCN4929Merchants in the Hunts Point Terminal Market continue talking about new and modern facilities, but in reality they are going nowhere.  Realistically, construction of such a facility will never happen.

For example, look at the 20014 agreement signed by market officials and the city’s Economic Development Corporation, which renewed the wholesale market’s lease for seven years.

There also have been major improvements  by large produce wholesalers such as Nathel & Nathel Inc., S. Katzman Produce Inc., and  E. Armata Inc., which operates from 24.5 market units and has made large investments into its facilities.

These wholesale distributors are not wasting their monies.  When you see companies spending this kind of money, you know Hunts Point isn’t going anywhere.

The historic Hunts Point neighborhood location in the South Bronx, provides an ideal location for the facility because it is close to New York City’s area metropolitan boroughs.

There has been talk about a new market in New York for more than a decade.

How would you get all of these merchants into the new market over time or at the same time? I don’t foresee any change.”

“There’s been a lot of talk about this market moving or rebuilding,” said Sheldon Nathel, vice president of Nathel & Nathel recently. “This has been going on for 13-14 years.  A lot of the people on the market seem to be putting a lot more money into their stores lately. We followed suit. Who knows where this market will be in five years?”

Federal government monies are being actively pursed by Hunts Point leaders to upgrade the world’s largest fresh produce terminal.  There are 22 million people in the Tri-State area that Hunts Point serves.

The facilities at Hunts Point are antiquated and everything from old plumbing to grid lock is constantly causing problems.  There often are electrical lines reported exploding and transformers breaking for lack of capacity.

 

 

 

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Hunts Point Upgrade Study is Set

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DSCN4931By Empire State Development

Empire State Development (ESD) announced that Hunts Point Terminal Produce Cooperative Association will conduct a feasibility study to determine the best way to upgrade the facilities at the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market, in the Bronx, to remain competitive in the region and comply with federal food-safety standards.

“The Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market has been putting food on our tables and creating jobs in the New York City region for decades,” said ESD President, CEO & Commissioner Howard Zemsky. “With upgraded facilities, it will continue to provide a marketplace for local farmers for years to come. Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, New York State is working to upgrade vital infrastructure from Buffalo to Long Island.”

“For the past 50 years, the Hunts Point Produce Market has been a vital engine of commerce in the South Bronx – generating nearly $500 million in annual impact,” said Hunts Point Produce Market Cooperative Association Co-Presidents Joel Fierman and Joseph Palumbo. “Thanks to ESD, we will have a realistic look at how best to ensure we remain competitive, retain and expand our employment footprint, and evolve to meet the needs of New Yorkers for the next fifty years. It is our intention to keep the Market here in the Bronx. Much like the Yankees, this is our home – and with the State’s help we can remain here.”

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr. said, “My office welcomes this much needed study made possible by Empire State Development. The Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market is one of our largest employers and an economic development engine that drives the entire region. It is important that we take a strong look at the market and plan for a stronger, safer and more fruitful future for the businesses and the thousands of workers employed within. I commend Governor Cuomo and ESD for committing considerable funding to take a serious look at the infrastructure and redevelopment needs of perhaps the largest food market in the world.”

The Hunts Point Terminal Produce Cooperative Market will conduct the necessary engineering studies to determine the feasibility and cost estimates of renovating its existing buildings vs constructing new buildings and infrastructure at its Bronx location. The work will be necessary to keep the market competitive with others in Philadelphia and Boston and will ensure that the Market complies with current and future federal food regulations.

The Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market employs 10,000 people and generates $2.4 billion in sales annually. The market operates as a cooperative, with an elected board of directors. It receives 210 million packages of fruits and vegetables each year, from 55 countries and 49 states, catering to the most ethnically diverse region in the world, with an estimated population of 23 million people.

To encourage the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Cooperative Association to proceed with this feasibility study ESD is providing it with a $250,000 Regional Economic Development Council grant. The study is expected to be completed by September 2016.

About the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market:

Located in Hunts Point region of Bronx, NY, the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market is the largest wholesale produce market in the world, sitting on 113 acres of property comprising of 1 million square feet of interior space. We offer an amazingly diverse selection of fruits and vegetables from around the globe. Our produce is delivered fresh daily via plane, boat, train and tractor trailer from 49 states and 55 countries. Through the years, we at Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market maintain the traditions of our predecessors. We uphold traditions of excellence, quality, hard work and family. Some of the Market’s business proprietors are second and third generation businesspeople whose roots trace back to Washington Market. The market operates as a cooperative with an elected board of directors.

About Empire State Development

Empire State Development (ESD) is New York’s chief economic development agency (www.esd.ny.gov). The mission of ESD is to promote a vigorous and growing economy, encourage the creation of new job and economic opportunities, increase revenues to the State and its municipalities, and achieve stable and diversified local economies. Through the use of loans, grants, tax credits and other forms of financial assistance, ESD strives to enhance private business investment and growth to spur job creation and support prosperous communities across New York State. ESD is also the primary administrative agency overseeing Governor Cuomo’s Regional Economic Development Councils and the marketing of “I Love NY,” the State’s iconic tourism brand. For more information on Regional Councils and Empire State Development, visit www.nyworks.ny.gov and www.esd.ny.gov.

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Baldor’s $20 million Hunts Point Expansion

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baldorBaldor Specialty Foods has closed on a lease amendment that will expand its facility in the Hunts Point neighborhood in the Bronx, NY, by 100,000 square feet. The lease, signed with the New York City Economic Development Corp., will allow the fresh produce and specialty food distributor to strengthen the area’s robust food and beverage distribution network.

The Hunts Point Food Distribution Center is one of the largest in the world and includes the Hunts Point Terminal Produce Market, the Hunts Point Cooperative Meat Market, the New Fulton Fish Market, and parcels leased to companies, including Baldor and Krasdale Foods.

The nearly $20 million expansion, funded entirely by Baldor, will create 350 new quality jobs in addition to 400 jobs the company has created since moving to the Food Distribution Center in 2007. The expansion will allow Baldor to grow its fresh cuts manufacturing operation and increase its distribution to customers across the city and metropolitan region, including restaurants, hotels, retail food stores, corporate kitchens, nursing homes, hospitals and schools. The project will also serve to promote regional food distribution, adding capacity to Baldor’s current operation that already serves over 50 local farms and partners by distributing 40,000 cases of local product into the regional food system each week during peak season.

“This expansion solidifies our Bronx location as the headquarters of Baldor Specialty Foods,” TJ Murphy, owner and chief executive officer of Baldor Specialty Foods, said in a press release. “We are proud to make this investment in the Bronx, to strengthen our commitment to Hunts Point, and to continue to be a strong supporter of the area’s overall economic development.”

Currently, Baldor occupies a 193,000-square-foot warehouse distribution facility with over 1,000 employees located on 13 acres in the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center, which it leases from the city. The lease amendment will allow Baldor to expand its facility and relocate its parking spaces to the adjacent Halleck Industrial Development site. Baldor was selected through a public Request for Proposals issued in 2013. The project is consistent with the goals of the Hunts Point Vision Plan to catalyze food-related industrial uses and create local jobs.

Together, approximately half of the food in New York City stores and restaurants passes through the NYCEDC-managed Hunts Point Food Distribution Center. The cluster of wholesale markets sits on 329 acres and support 115 private wholesalers that employ more than 8,000 people. In March 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the City will invest $150 million over 12 years to enhance the capacity of the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center, strengthen existing businesses, and attract new entrepreneurs, generating nearly 900 construction jobs and approximately 500 permanent jobs.

 

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Hunts Point is No Closer to Having Modern Facilities

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DSCN4933Despite a mayoral pledge to revitalize operations, the nearly two-decade battle to modernize the Hunts Point Terminal Market’s distribution facilities appears no closer to completion.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio in early March announced his administration plans to invest $150 million over 12 years to revitalize aging operations.  However some Hunts Point wholesalers say the mayor wasn’t specifically talking about the Hunts Point Produce Terminal.

Instead, the mayor’s announcement was neighborhood-specific and was referring to all the food markets on the Hunts Point peninsula, which include the Fulton Fish Market and the Hunts Point Cooperative Market, which is also known as the Hunts Point Meat Market.  When one does the math, $150 million over 12 years doesn’t amount to much and isn’t considered remarkable.

The $150 million isn’t anywhere near the $800 million needed to modernize operations, although the city is spending money to improve the market.  It is pointed out that a $21 million project constructing railroad sidings alongside the market’s buildings and constructing an open-air rail shed on the market’s east side for freight car unloading is underway.

At the 329-acre facility, 115 wholesalers that employ more than 8,000 workers distribute from the market’s four buildings that were constructed in the late 1960s.  Talks to move distributors out of the aging 500,000-square-foot market began in 2000.

Washington produce rates on apples, cherries – grossing about $7400 to New York City.

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Nathel & Nathel Expands Operations at Hunts Point

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DSCN4954Nathel & Nathel Inc. has expanded operations on the Hunts Point Terminal Market located in the South Bronx of New York City.

The New York-based wholesaler has added refrigeration capacity, reconfigured its fruit and vegetable divisions and improved its docks for truck loading and unloading.  Following the closure of  Krisp-Pak Sales Corp. in 2012, Nathel & Nathel took over its units and was working on closing on the purchase of units from the defunct Korean Farm, which went out of business in 2014.

Nathel & Nathel now distributes produce from to 23 units.

The distributor also upgraded the warehouse to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point standards.

Better refrigeration control in different zones will result from the improvements, according to company vice president Sheldon Nathel said.    It also should result in better temperature control for fruits and vegetables as well as better organize the operation, making it more efficient.

Nathel & Nathel sells a full line of fruits and vegetables, including tropicals and specialties, to customers throughout the Tri-State region.

The Hunts Point Terminal Market occupies 329 acres and supports 115 private wholesalers that employ over 8,000 people.

Hunts Point wholesalers are paying a freight rate of about $5000 from the Lower Rio Grand Valley of Texas for fruits and vegetables, and about $4800 for Idaho potatoes.

 

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Katzman at Hunts Point is Acquiring Okun Inc.

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DSCN4920S. Katzman Produce Inc. is purchasing  the unites of Morris Okun Inc.on the Bronx, N.Y.-based Hunts Point Terminal Market.

It continues a trend of fewer but larger wholesalers on the world’s largest produce wholesale terminal market.  In 1967 there were 125 wholesalers.  Today, there are 40 wholesalers, but it soon will be 39.

Katzman, which also operates Katzman Berry Corp., contracted to buy Okun’s 16 units on Row B after purchasing five units on Row D in late January, said Steve Katzman, president.

The purchase expands Katzman’s market presence from 21 units to 37 units on the 262 unit terminal,

Okun owner Roni Okun has decide to retire.  The Okun name will not be retained.

Katzman Produce owns 100 vans storing produce alongside the terminal and Katzman said the purchase should help easy some of the market’s space headaches.

“This will help us tremendously in the expansion of our business,” he said. “We will have more refrigeration space and have plans to modernize the units. This will help us with not having to double-handle product and helps by not breaking the cold chain.”

Distributing a full line of fruit and vegetables to retailers and foodservice purveyors throughout the Tri-State region, Okun began operations in 1926 as a small family-owned venture on the old Washington Market in south Manhattan.

A fourth-generation family company, Katzman sells conventional, organic and specialty produce to retailers, restaurants, distributors and caterers throughout the Northeast as well as to customers in Canada, Europe and the North Atlantic.

Katzman’s produce lineage traces to 1890 when Samuel Katzman sold bunched greens and other vegetables from a horse and wagon.

The Katzman operation is also a partner with Top Banana LLC in Top Katz Brokers LLC.

 

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Hunts Point to Receive $150 Million Revitilization

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DSCN4975New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced plans to invest $150 million to revitalize the Hunts Point Terminal Market in the Bronx, NY, over 12 years, “fortifying a vital aspect of our infrastructure: our food supply,” he said Thursday, March 5, at an Association for a Better New York event.

de Blasio said the plans will modernize the buildings and infrastructure that are currently at Hunts Point and open up new space for small businesses. “More than that, this is a bold vision, with a major financial commitment that will make the site resilient and sustainable, improving New York’s readiness for natural disasters like Superstorm Sandy,” he said.

“It’s hard to overstate how important this facility is for our city,” the mayor noted.
The Hunts Point Terminal Market occupies 329 acres and supports 115 private wholesalers that employ over 8,000 people. “These are good, decent-paying jobs for New Yorkers at every education level,” de Blasio said. “Our plan protects those jobs and positions the site to create many more jobs for New Yorkers in the future.”

The plan will also include dedicated space to better link New Yorkers to food that is grown and produced in upstate New York, strengthening the city’s partnership with upstate communities, farms and businesses.

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Hunts Point, New York City Sign 7-Year Lease Agreement

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102_0299On the last day of the Bloomberg administration, city officials bought some time in their long-running effort to keep the Hunts Points Terminal Produce Market from leaving the Bronx for New Jersey or elsewhere.

New York City’s Economic Development Corporation announced on Tuesday that, after years of sometimes contentious negotiations, the market’s lease had been renewed for seven years. The agreement keeps the wholesale market and its 3,000 jobs in the South Bronx until June 2021. The market, which has operated since 1967, has an option to renew the lease for 10 years after that.

The agreement is a step toward developing a long-term plan to overhaul the market, which occupies more than 100 acres. The city agreed to reduce the maximum annual rent the market pays to $4 million from $4.5 million. In return, the market agreed to reduce the amount it can deduct from that rent for repairs it makes to its infrastructure to $1.5 million from $2.25 million annually.
 
Hunts Point is the world’s largest wholesale produce market.  Thousands of refrigerated 18 wheelers from all over North America deliver fresh fruits and vegetables to the compound each week.  The product is then distributed mostly on a regional basis, the nation’s most populated area.

By The New York Times

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