Posts Tagged “Port of Oakland”

Produce Imports Help Set Records at Ports Manatee and Oakland

By |

manatee-port-shipThe ports of Manatee and Oakland are having record-setting years, with much of that success coming from produce imports.

Port of Manatee

The Port of Manatee’s container volume already has handled as volume in 10 has it has totaled in a record setting 12-month year..

The Florida-based port has moved 32,907 20-foot-equivalent (TEU) container units since October 1st, surpassing the full-year record of 30,431 TEUs, which was set in the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2010.

A news release from Port Manatee points out the record-setting container volume represents a 47 percent increase over the first 10 months of the preceding fiscal year.

The increase is primarily attributed to Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A. switching from breakbulk shipping to containers for imports of Central American pineapple and bananas, as well as to the success of World Direct’s weekly shipping service which transports refrigerated produce from Mexico.

“We are excited to have already set a new container record for Port Manatee and are further encouraged this favorable trend is anticipated to be sustained for a long time,” Carlos Buqueras, Port Manatee’s executive director, said in the release.

The port’s tonnage also increased in the first 10 months of its fiscal year, topping last fiscal year’s numbers by 17 percent.

Port of Oakland

A record for import cargo in July has been set by The Port of Oakland.

The port handled 84,835 loaded 20-foot import containers in July, which tops the previous record of 84,023 containers set in March 2015.

A press release from the California port shows import volume through the first seven months of the year was also up 3.7 percent over the same time last year.

Looking ahead, Port of Oakland leaders believey they foresee a five-year period of record cargo volume beginning in 2018.

That prediction comes from the recently released Strategic Maritime Roadmap.  The roadmap forecasts a record volume of 2.4 million cargo containers in 2018.

The roadmap also predicts greater volumes arriving on larger ships driven by Northern California’s robust freight market along with new distribution and freight transfer centers.  The document predicts ships will be 35 percent larger within 15 years.

“We’re serving a thriving area and developing new services for our customers,” Oakland’s maritime director John Driscoll said. “The combination should be positive for everyone who relies on the port for their business or their job.”

Read more »

Mastronardi Aquires Backyard Farms; Volume Grows from Port of Oakland

By |

DSCN2858+1Canadian greenhouse growing operation Mastronardi Produce and purchased another greenhouse growing facility in the state of Maine.

Family owned and operated fourth generation business Mastronardi Produce of Kingsville, ON has acquired New England year-round greenhouse tomato grower Backyard Farms of Madison, ME.  Mastronardi The leading grower and shipper of specialty and commodity greenhouse produce in North America,  Backyard was launched 10 years ago and ships primarily throughout the Northeastern United States.

Together, Mastronardi Produce and Backyard Farms will grow and ship non-GMO verified tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers to the top food retailers in North America.  Backyard Farms operates two greenhouses totaling 42-acres

About Mastronardi Produce

Ours span over 60 years to the pioneering of the North American greenhouse industry. Before Grandpa Umberto Mastronardi came along, there were no commercial greenhouses in North America. His vision was to provide consumers with fresh greenhouse grown vegetables all year long. After four generations, the Mastronardi family still owns and manages what is now the leading greenhouse vegetable company on the continent, growing and selling world-class tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers.

Port of Oakland Cargo Handling Update

California’s Port of Oakland saw import cargo increase 19 percent in March compared with a year ago.
Total loaded container volume for both imports and exports, were up 9.3 percent. The increase contrasted with a 9.2 percent decline in February, according to a news release.
“This is a nice rebound,” maritime director John Driscoll, said in the release. “We’re watching now to find out if it signals stronger trade growth for the rest of the year.”
Port figures indicated 402 ships called in Oakland during the first three months of 2017, down about 5.6 percent from a year ago.  At the same time, those ships carried an average of 8.4 percent more containers in and out of Oakland.  The conflicting trends point to greater volume on fewer ships, according to the release.
That trend will result in several positive trends, according to the release, including reduced vessel operating expenses for shipping lines, less demand for berthing space at marine terminals and a reduction in diesel emissions at port because of fewer vessel calls.

Read more »

Port of Oakland Expanding; Port of Los Angeles Sets a Record

By |

OaklandPort1Expanding to handle more containerized cargo by investing $600 million has been announced by the  Port of Oakland.

Speaking to a maritime audience at the American Association of Port Authorities Conference recently in Tampa, Fla., Port of Oakland Maritime Director John Driscoll outlined a partnership designed to increase trade volume by investing in new facilities and better infrastructure.

“We’re building for growth in a shipping industry that is becoming more and more competitive,” Driscoll said in a news release. “By investing with partners who share our vision, we can deliver services that will be of great value to the global supply chain.”

Driscoll noted the port would work with private developers and public agencies to modernize its infrastructure and outlined three proposed investment projects:

  • $244 million, mostly from government grants, to separate railroad tracks from major port roadways;
  • $90 million for a privately built refrigerated warehouse called “Cool Port;” and
  • $50 million to expand the port’s second-largest marine terminal, with private funds.

Driscoll noted that the port recently completed a $100-million railyard near marine terminals and a proposed logistics complex, both of which should be a drawing card for shippers, enabling cargo to be quickly shifted between rail, road and ocean transport.

The Port of Oakland agricultural tonnage grew 233% over the past five years and now represents 53% of the port’s total export tonnage. Fruits and nuts are the leading agricultural commodities shipped from the port. The Port of Oakland oversees the Oakland Seaport, Oakland International Airport, and 20 miles of waterfront.

The Port of Los Angeles

January 2017 was the busiest January and second busiest month in the Port of Los Angeles’ 110-year history

“Coming off our best year ever in 2016, it’s very encouraging to keep the momentum going into 2017,” Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Gene Seroka said in a news release. “The port remains diligent, along with our partners, in making the San Pedro Bay supply chain even more efficient through world-class infrastructure, innovative technology solutions and strategic use of resources.”

January 2017 imports increased 13.1% compared to January 2016. Exports increased 28.7% compared to the previous year. Empty containers increased 17.9%. Combined, January 2017 saw a 17.4% increase compared to last year.

Fruit and vegetable imports for January 2017 were 4,885 TEU (20-foot equivalent units), according to Phillip Sanfield, Port of Los Angeles director of media relations. Those imports accounted for 1.1% of the total 415,423 TEUs imported that month. Fruit and vegetable export numbers were not available.

 

Read more »

Ocean Carrier Alliance Changes Welcomed by Port of Oakland

By |

OaklandAlliance changes in the way container shipping lines operate are being welcomed by an executive with the Port of Oakland, CA.

Newly formed ocean carrier alliances will help the port, according to Maritime Director John Driscoll in a news release from the facility.

“We’ll see larger vessels coming to the port, which is a good thing,” he told employees in a podcast on the port’s website, portofoakland.com. “We’ll get more container moves-per-vessel which increases the efficiency of operations.”

Driscoll also said the port will receive a new weekly vessel service as a result of carrier realignment. Taiwan-based Wan Hai Lines plans to launch a new route connecting Oakland and Asia, which will increase to 29 the number of regularly scheduled vessel services calling Oakland.

“It’s a good sign when new players come to Oakland,” Driscoll said in the release.

The changes result from an April 1 realignment in which 11 of the world’s largest shipping lines formed three new alliances. Alliances let carriers pool ships on ocean routes to cut costs while expanding market reach. The carriers plan to deploy larger vessels in their alliances, carrying more containers to the U.S. West Coast. That should enable them to reduce the number of voyages while maintaining cargo volume levels, Driscoll said.

New alliance configurations should have little effect on Oakland operations, Driscoll said, noting that some vessels will change which of Oakland’s three international marine terminals they call, but the terminals are prepared.

The first vessels operating under new alliance configurations arrived in Oakland during the week of April 17.

Oakland has regular service to ports in Asia, Northern Europe and the Mediterranean, Latin America, Oceania and Hawaii.

The Port of Oakland was established in 1927 on the East shore of San Francisco Bay.  Port history spans a period of 165 years, which encompassed the Civil War, the Industrial Revolution, two World Wars, and America’s coming of age as a global power.

Read more »

Port of Oakland Sets a Record for Loaded Container Volume

By |

oaklandportThis past year loaded shipping container volume reached an all-time high at the Port of Oakland, CA.

The port reported a 7.6 percent increase handling the equivalent of 1.83 million loaded 20-foot containers last year — which beat the previous record of 1.82 million 20-footers in 2013.

The port attributed the milestone to a year-long containerized export boom, as well as growth in imports.  It noted the record is important since loaded container volume is a key measure used to calculate fees paid by Oakland’s marine terminal tenants.  Increased volume means the port gained business in 2016, even though it consolidated five terminals into four.

“This is a gratifying outcome,” Port of Oakland Maritime Director John Driscoll said in a press release.

Port officials said total 2016 volume — full and empty containers — equaled 2.37 million 20-foot containers, up 4 percent from 2015.

Containerized export volume jumped 10.5 percent in 2016.  In December, exports were up 13.5 percent — the fourth straight month of double-digit export growth.

Oakland import volume increased 4.7 percent last year, while December imports were up 6.1 percent.

Exports accounted for 52 percent of Oakland’s loaded container volume in 2016.

Port of Oakland History

Originally, the enclosed coaster body of water, 500 feet wide, had a depth of two feet at mean low tide. In 1852, the year of Oakland‘s incorporation as a town by the California State Legislature, large shipping wharves were constructed along the Oakland Estuary, which was dredged to create a viable shipping channel. 22 years later, in 1874, the previously dredged shipping channel was deepened to make Oakland a deep water port.

In the late 19th century, the Southern Pacific was granted exclusive rights to the port, a decision the city soon came to regret. In January 1906, a small work party in the employ of the Western Pacific Railroad, which had just begun construction, hastily threw a crossing over the SP line to connect the WP mainline with trackage built on an area of landfill. This act, protested by the SP and later held up in court, broke the railroad’s grip on the port area. The courts ruled that all landfill since the date of the agreement did not belong to the SP. This ruling ended SP control and made the modern Port of Oakland possible.

 

Read more »

Trucker Appointments Required by 3 Oakland Marine Terminals

By |

port-of-oaklandIf you are a trucker wanting to pick up cargo at the Port of Oakland, you pretty much have to have an appointment now.  A third marine terminal operator is now requiring appointments.

TraPac  of Wilmington, CA has announced it was requiring appointments for all import container pick-ups.  The change became effective December 6th.   The purpose of the new appointment system is designed to reduce waiting times by truckers and to more evenly distribute truck arrivals throughout each day at the port.

TraPac becomes the third of four terminals in Oakland to require appointments — the others are Everport and Oakland International Container Terminal.  Combined, the three terminals  handle more than 90 percent of the containerized cargo moving through the Port of Oakland.

Port of Oakland maritime director John Driscoll praised TraPac for making the change.

He maintained it is not easy introducing new operating procedures, but customers and harbor truckers benefit whenever the process can be sped up  to increase container throughput.

Oakland is one of only a handful of ports nationwide with an appointment system. Oakland port officials say appointments are seen as essential to accelerating cargo flow at ports coping with bigger ships and growing container volumes.

TraPac said truck dispatchers can log on to the nationwide port information system eModal to make appointments. The company said the requirement for appointments applies — for the present — only to loaded import containers. TraPac said truck drivers won’t need reservations for export deliveries or to pick up or return empty containers. It said it will communicate “well in advance” when it plans to expand appointments to all transactions.

Appointments are the second measure implemented at TraPac this fall intended to improve terminal performance.  Nearly three months ago, the terminal began opening selective night gates to ease daytime crowding. In October, port commissioners approved a new lease enabling TraPac to double its size in Oakland next year.

Read more »

Oakland Port Volume is Up 20% in October

By |

oaklandport1Export volume at the Port of Oakland, CA hit a three-year high in October as the facility shipped the equivalent of 89,473 20-foot containers.

The total was the highest since October 2013 and the fourth-highest in the port’s history, according to a news release.  Agricultural commodities account for 40 percent of the port’s total export volume so far this year.  In 2015 agricultural commodities accounted for 38 percent of the total.

Those numbers come from Datamyne, a source of trade intelligence that uses U.S. Customs and Border Protection data, according to Mike Zampa, communications director for Port of Oakland.  Exports of fruits and vegetables from California’s Central, Napa and Salinas valleys go through the port.

Year-to-date exports from the Port of Oakland are up 10 percent over 2015.  Contributing factors to the increase include “a softer U.S. dollar and healthy agricultural harvests,” according to the release.

“Increased export volume is nothing new; we’ve reported gains in nine of the first 10 months of the year,” Port of Oakland maritime director John Driscoll said in the release, “but the amount of volume growth highlights just how strong this rally is.” 

Port History

According Wikipiedia, originally, the estuary, 500 feet (150 m) wide, had a depth of two feet at mean low tide. In 1852, the year of Oakland‘s incorporation as a town by the California State Legislature, large shipping wharves were constructed along the Oakland Estuary, which was dredged to create a viable shipping channel. 22 years later, in 1874, the previously dredged shipping channel was deepened to make Oakland a deep water port.

In the late 19th century, the Southern Pacific was granted exclusive rights to the port, a decision the city soon came to regret. In January 1906, a small work party in the employ of the Western Pacific Railroad, which had just begun construction, hastily threw a crossing over the SP line to connect the WP mainline with trackage built on an area of landfill. This act, protested by the SP and later held up in court, broke the railroad’s grip on the port area. The courts ruled that all landfill since the date of the agreement did not belong to the SP. This ruling ended SP control and made the modern Port of Oakland possible.

(Port of Oakland photo by:  Robert Campbell, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

 

Read more »

Imported Produce at U.S. Ports is Increasing

By |

Imported produce is relatively light, but is increasing as we advance further into fall.  Full tilt will come during the winter months and continue until the North American spring starts coming into view.  The vast majority of arrivals will be by boat at various U.S. ports.

Among the heaviest volumes right now are Mexican limes and lemons, crossing the border primarily through South Texas.  Both are increasing in volume with limes averaging about 500 truck loads weekly, and lemons about half this amount.  Mexican blueberries also are very light, but will be increasing in volume crossing the border in both Texas and Nogales.  There’s also light volume of Peruvian blueberries coming by boat.

There is increasing arrivals of South African Valencia oranges at U.S. ports.  Mexican Valencias will be very light until mid October through South Texas….Chile is a major supplier of winter fruit to the U.S., but that will mostly be after the first of the year. However, nearly 400 truck load equivalents of Chilean tangerines are currently arriving weekly…..Mexican avocados through Texas would normally be heavier now, but there is a strike underway by Mexican growers.

Port of Oakland

TraPac LLC plans to lease an additional 57 acres and two vessel berths nearly double its marine terminal size on the Outer Harbor at the Port of Oakland.

TraPac is the second-largest terminal operator in Oakland and a proposed 14-year lease agreement with the port will become final if approved at an October 27 board meeting.

“This is a significant step forward for TraPac and the port,” port maritime director John Driscoll said in a news release. “TraPac gets room to expand its thriving business and the port gets to revitalize valuable property with a highly respected tenant.”

TraPac, based in Wilmington, CA, handles 20 percent of the containerized cargo moving through the Port of Oakland.  Under the new agreement, it would have four berths and 123 acres.  Much of the land would be used for cargo handling.

TraPac began Oakland operations in 1991 and also manages other terminals in Los Angeles and Jacksonville, FL

The company plans to construct a new gate to give harbor truckers better access to the terminal.

Read more »