Posts Tagged “peach shipments”

The Changing Face of Spring Produce Shipments out of Florida

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A4The face of Florida spring produce shipments long have been centered around citrus, mixed vegetables and tomatoes.  This will continue to be the case in the foreseeable future, but there are some other products that have entered the picture and could provide substantially larger volume in the future.

Florida peach shipments have started in recent years, and the state is heavily promoting the stone fruit, particularly in April, when it has a shipping window pretty much to itself.  Florida peaches are shipped as imported Chilean peaches are winding down, and before the product is ready in California, Georgia and South Carolina.

Asian vegetables are relatively new to Florida produce production, which are grown across the state and have a growing concentration in the St. Augustine/Hastings area of North Florida.

These items range from Chinese cabbage, to bok choy, beans, bitter melon, Chinese broccoli and many other Asian herbs and vegetables.  As these items become more mainstream, there will be more loading opportunities for produce haulers.

There also has been increasing acreage with sweet potatoes in recent years.  Florida has the first domestic sweet potatoes of the growing season prior to the traditional Louisiana, Mississippi, California and North Carolina sweet potato seasons that start in late summer.

Brussels sprouts are another up-and-coming crop in Florida, particularly in the Hastings area.  Cabbage traditionally has been a staple crop in this area, but growers in the area have recently branched out to other crops, such as broccoli and cauliflower and Brussels sprouts.

Florida Tomato Shipments

Grower, shippers such as Oakes Farms Inc. of Immokalee and DiMare Co. of Homestead launched tomato shipments in October and continue into June.  Tomato volume typically has a substainal volume increase starting in the middle of March.

Between March and May, Florida accounts for 55 percent of grape and cherry tomato shipments in the U.S. and 41 percent of the round tomatoes.

On average, Florida supplied 100 percent of temple oranges, 70 percent of sweet corn, and 55 percent of snap beans shipped the U.S. from 2014-17.

Florida produce shipments – grossing about $3200 to New York City.

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Produce Consumption is Up in New Report; South Carolina Peach Disaster is Recounted

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DSCN0045In a  new report consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables has risen significantly since November 2008 compared with processed fruits and vegetables.  Meanwhile, a look back is taken of the disastrous season in South Carolina for peach shipments.

Wells Fargo reports consumption of fresh fruits has grown 16.2 percent and consumption of fresh vegetables has grown 20.6 percent, compared to processed fruits and vegetables, which grew 9.9 percent during the same time period. The report said processed fruits and vegetables are sold in the freezer aisle and as canned goods, according to the report by Eugenio J. Aleman, senior economist for company.

Consumers have “rationally reacted to much higher prices on the processed side in relation to the fresh side,” Aleman said in a story published recently by the Wall Street Journal. “In relative terms, fresh fruits and vegetables are cheaper today than processed fruits and vegetables are.”

Fresh fruit and vegetable prices were trending upward leading into the 2008 recession and have remained relatively static since.  However, prices for processed fruits and vegetables are higher now than at any time before the recession.

Acknowledging it is difficult to know whether price-consciousness or health-consciousness is driving the increase in consumption, the study notes younger consumers especially have shifted more toward fresh food consumption.  For those under 40 years old, fresh vegetable consumption has increased by 52 percent over the last 10 years.

However, a decrease in price for processed produce could have consumers looking more toward their pocketbooks than their health.

Titan Peach Shipments

Titan Farms in Ridge Spring, SC, the largest peach grower on the East Coast, suffered a $30 million loss when temperatures dropped to 17 and 22 degrees March 15 and 16, according to Daryl Johnston, vice president for sales and marketing.  He said Titan lost 80 to 85 percent of its peach crop to the freeze.

This includes 6,100 acres of peaches in production stretching over 100 square miles in three counties.  Titan normally grows more peaches than the entire state of Georgia, “the Peach State.”

Looking back, Titan was loading 12 truckloads of peaches in mid July, when it would normally pack 100 to 150 truckloads at the height of the season.  The peach shipper lost all but 10 to 15 percent of its crop.

Since 2001, Titan has increased peach acreage by 400 percent.

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Georgia Produce Shipping Update; Port Manatee is Looking to Expand Business

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DSCN1324+1There’s been some adjustments in the shipping forecast for some Georgia produce shipments since a March freeze.  Also, Port Manatee in Florida is looking to expand business with South America.

An update on Georgia produce shipments has been made after the USDA declare nearly two dozen counties a disaster as a result of a March freeze.

Georgia blueberry shipments will be 75 percent less this season.  Loading are taking place and will continue through June.  Georgia had originally estimated a total of 80 million pounds for the fresh and processed markets.   2016 blueberry shipments totaled a little over 70 million pounds, with about 45 million pounds going to the fresh market.  Georgia’s record year of blueberry production was 96 million pounds total volume in 2014, 58 million pounds of which went to the fresh market.

Peaches

Georgia peach shipments are starting any day now.  While the original estimate for losses from the freeze were in the 40 to 50 percent range, the losses have now improved.  Recently some growers was talking peach shipments should be down about 25 to 35 percent.  Last year, Georgia shipped 43,000 tons of peaches.

Vidalia Onions

There is good supply, quality and steady shipments of Vidalia onions occurring, averaging about 500 truck loads per week. Vidalia onions were the only Georgia produce crop not affected by that March freeze.

Vidalia onions – grossing about $2000 to Chicago.

Vegetable shipments

Georgia green bean shipments have been underway since the first week of May and should continue through mid-July.  Sweet corn is just getting underway, but good volume won’t occur until  June and continuing through July Fourth.  Georgia squash and zucchini loadings started a couple weeks early this season and will run through June.

Port Manatee

Port Manatee, Palmetto, Fla., is planning to expand commercial ties with Colombia and Chile.

“We see significant opportunity for growing trade between our nation and Port Manatee,” Juan C. Barrera, general deputy director for the United States of ProColombia USA, said in a news release. “Both import and export opportunities exist for businesses in Manatee County and beyond, and we look forward to exploring these mutually beneficial possibilities,”

“We are enthused about fortifying the business relationship between Manatee County interests, including our port, and our counterparts in Colombia and are committed to growing such ties,” Carlos Buqueras, executive director of Port Manatee, said in the release.

“We have the largest dock side refrigerated facility in Florida,” Buqueras said. “We have such capacity, it’s a shame not to utilize it.”

A deal with Chile is still in negotiations, Buqueras said.

“It’ll start with test shipments,” he said. “That will give us the opportunity to make corrections or enhance speed to market,”

Produce currently represents 30% of Port Manatee’s import business, according to Buqueras. He said it is too early in negotiations to say how much produce imports would increase because of expanded ties.

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Volume Florida Spring Produce Shipments are Just Around the Corner

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SweetCorn+1If great spring weather for growing vegetables, combined with optimism by Florida shippers mean anything, this should be one of the better years in a while for hauling produce from the Sunshine state.

Dozens of mixed vegetables are now being shipped, or will soon get underway.  Similar to the strawberry crop that got an early start this season from the Plant City area (and is now finished), one would think Florida vegetable shipments would follow a similar path of earlier than usual volume.

April and May are typically the heaviest volume months, so we’ll see.  The biggest movers currently are mature green, plum and grape tomatoes averaging over 350 truck loads a week.  Other leading items are cabbage, sweet corn, potatoes (red, white and yellow), bell peppers  and green beans.  Very light volume is with numerous veggies ranging from cucumbers to lettuce, radish, and celery to eggplant.

Keep in mind, Florida isn’t Mexico or California when it comes to volume.  There’s a reason so many multiple pick ups and drops are associated with hauling produce out of Florida.

Spring watermelons are heavy volume in season, but the first melons from Florida will not start until around the middle of April from the Immokalee area.  In fact, most loadings of Florida produce for the next several weeks will occur in Southern and Central areas of the state.

Another significant item is Florida blueberry shipments, which have been increasing in volume in recent years.  “Blues” will be starting in April.

Although Florida doesn’t compare to South Carolina, Georgia, or certainly not California, it does ship peaches as far north as Canada and across the Mississippi River.  Operations such as Florida Sweet Peaches in Arcadia and Florida Classic Growers in Dundee have been expanding.  Peach shipments should get underway in late March and continue through April and possibly early May.

Florida vegetable shipments – grossing about $2400 to Philadelphia.

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National Shipping Outlook: CA Stone Fruit, Southeastern Produce, and Watermelons

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DSCN7451West coast produce shipments are early this year, while East Coast produce shipments are running late.  Here’s a round up on loading opportunities ranging from California stone fruit, Southeastern produce shipments and watermelons.

Stone Fruit Shipments

California stone fruit shipments have started a few days earlier than normal.  Last year shipments totaled about 35 million cartons.  This year estimates are about 40 million cartons.  Apricot shipments got underway a couple of weeks ago. Good volume is expected in the days leading up to the Memorial weekend May 28-30.

Yellow nectarine shipments get underway around May 5th and yellow peach shipments will start about May 7-10.  Plum loadings kick off about June 1st.

Even at a total of 40 million cartons of the peach, plums and nectarines, California is still 20 percent below the volume it had a decade ago. A lot of fruit acreage was pulled out of the ground and replaced with nuts in first decade of this century.

Florida Produce Shipments

Unlike the early start for many California produce shipments, Florida is the opposite.  In late April, growers were beginning to ship good volume.  However, this was later than the typical mid-April start of larger shipments.  Large volumes of sweet corn shipments are seen for the month of May.  While some shippers had good volume the last week of April, other shippers will not move into good volume until the middle of May.

Florida vegetables shipments  – grossing about $3400 to New York City.

Georgia Sweet Corn Shipments

Georgia sweet corn should start shipping in small amounts from May 20 until early June, before hitting good volume.

Watermelon Shipments

Texas watermelon shipments should get underway the second week of May, while light supplies of Mexican melons continue to cross the border at McAllen.  Heavier Mexican melon volume is crossing the border at Nogales.  About 750 truck loads of Mexican watermelons crossed the border into Nogales last week, while volume continues to increase.  Florida watermelon shipments are miniscule to that at Nogales right now, but is increasing.

Mexican melons, tomatoes and vegetables at Nogales – grossing about $3200 to Chicago.

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Produce Shipments from the Carolinas are Underway

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IMG_6576Both South Carolina and North Carolina are expecting normal shipments of vegetables this summer, despite a a cold and wet spring that delayed plantings on some vegetables.  Tropical Storm Ana, which made landfall in South Carolina on May 10, drenched fields in both states and further delayed production of some vegetables.

South Carolina Produce Shipments

Up coming shipments on sweet corn, cabbage, squash, greens, cilantro, parsley, beets, leeks and eggplant look favorable.  South Carolina squash loadings started in mid-May, while sweet corn shipments should start next week.

WP Rawl, Pelion, S.C., and Clayton Rawl Farms in Lexington, S.C. are two of the state’s largest vegetable shippers.

South Carolina peach shipments continue, while watermelons will be coming on the latter part of June.

North Carolina Produce Shipments

Cabbage shipments will not get underway until the latter part of June, or early July a week or more later than normal.

Cabbage loadings typically have a gap between the start of coastal production near Elizabeth City, N.C., and the mountain region production near Mount Airy, N.C..  However, this season both shipping areas are expected to start at about the same time.  One of the state’s largest cabbage shippers is Hollar & Greene Produce Co. Inc. in Boone, N.C.

North Carolina usually begins sweet corn shipments a week later than Georgia.  North Carolina expects to start loading about June 1st….Squash shipments have just started, while potatoes should get underway around June 15-20.   Potato acreage remains at 17,000 acres and the state plans to ship red, white and yellow potatoes through late July.

Eastern North Carolinas continues to ship sweet potatoes entering the last couple of months of the season.

North Carolina sweet potatoes – grossing about $2500 to New York City.

 

 

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SC Peach Shipments will Continue into Sept.; Wisconsin Cranberry Loadings Start Soon

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HpblueTk1+1South Carolina produce peaches and vegetable loadings continue.   We also take a look a upcoming Wisconsin cranberry shipments.

South Carolina Produce Shipments

There is good volume peach shipments  from South Carolina that finally got going in July and will continue with nice volume through August, although a seasonal decline will begin soon.  Loadings, however will continue into September.

South Carolina, despite being a small state (41st in size among the 50 states), ranks high in produce shipments.  It is the nation’s second-largest shipper of peaches, behind California, and ahead of Georgia.  South Carolina places in the top 10 for truck loadings of leafy greens, cantaloupe, peanuts, watermelons, tomatoes, mixed vegetables and sweet potatoes.

South Carolina peaches and vegetables – grossing about $3400 to New York City.

Wisconsin Cranberry Shipments

Cranberrries have experienced a 57 percent increase in shipments nationwide from 2002 to 2013.  As a result, poor prices are resulting from too much fruit for the amount of demand.  Many U.S. growers are struggling to create new markets to absorb a growing oversupply of the tiny tart berries grown in marshes.   Wisconsin is at the center of the glut.  Between 2012 and 2013, Wisconsin had a 25 percent boost in production, a record-breaking harvest of 6 million barrels of cranberries.  The state produced 67 percent of all cranberries harvested in the United States in 2013, marking the 19th consecutive year as the country’s leader in cranberry shipper.

Central Wisconsin cranberry shipments will be starting in mid September in light volume.  Heaviest volume occurs as we enter November leading up to Thanksgiving (Nov. 27th).

 

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A National Glimpse of Produce Shipments from Nearly a Dozen States

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DSCN3858+1Here’s a quick glimpse at some produce loading opportunities from 11 different states ranging from coast-to-coast.

Washington Produce Shipments

Washington state continues to ship its 2013-14 season crop of apples, averaging about 1,500 truck load equivalents per week.  Also coming out of the Yakima and Wenachee vallies are fresh cherries.  Volume remains strong, but is still only about one-third the volume of apple shipments.

Washington fruit – grossing about $7500 to New York City.

Michigan Produce Shipments

Peach shipments from the Benton Harbor area and other areas of Southwest Michigan have started.  Loadings for the stone fruit are generally a relatively short haul – within a 500 mile radius for the most part.  Chicago is one of the more popular destinations…..Apples from the area are expected to get underway the third week of August.  Meanwhile, Michigan blueberry shipments are moving into good volume, while summer mixed veggies continue.

Michigan blueberries – grossing about $2700 to Atlanta; Michigan vegetables grossing 15 to 20 percent less.

New Jersey Produce Shipments

Garden State peach shipments started a couple of weeks ago and are now moving into good volume.  Jersey blueberry loadings are still occurring, butare now past peak volume.  The southern part of the state  also is shipping a mixture of vegetables.

Watermelon Shipments

Watermelon loadings continue from a number of states.  While eastern Texas watermelon shipments, as well as Georgia watermelon shipments are declining, volume is steady out of South Carolina, but cranking up in North Carolina, followed closely by the Eastern Shore states of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia…..Look for increasing volume of Missouri watermelons out of the boot heal area…..The watermelon season has recently started out of Southwest Indiana and Southeast Illinois.

 

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From Coast-to-Coast Here are some Produce Loading Opportunities

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DSCN3219+1Tennessee Produce Shipments, Kentucky Produce Shipments

Looking around the nation, here are a number of active produce shipping areas ranging from Kentucky and Tennessee to Georgia, South Carolina, and California’s San Joaquin Valley.

Although they are a couple of weeks late, shipments of vegetables from Kentucky and Tennessee are underway.

Just want you to know though, most of these loadings are only to regional, if not local markets.  Items range from beans to cucumbers, lettuce, tomatoes, and a few peaches.

Loadings occur at shipping operations in such  Tennessee towns as Lebanon (near Nashville), Crossville (about halfway between Nashville and Knoxville  and Rutledge in Northeastern Tennessee.

California Produce Shipments

California pear shipments from the Sacramento River District are just getting underway this week.  Shipments from Mendocino County will get started around August 4th, followed by Lake County about August 11th.

Total Bartlett pear volume should hit about 2.6 million  cartons, down from 2.9 million a year ago.  About 500,000 cartons of other pear varieties also will be shipped led by the boscs variety.

California Grape Shipments

Table grapes from the Arvin District in the Bakersfield are  picking up in volume as the new season for the San Joaquin Valley heads towards good volume.

Peach Shipments

California’s San Joaquin Valley has been shipping moderate amounts of peaches for a few weeks and is averaging about 425 truckloads per week.

Meanwhile, in the Southeast, peach shipments are building and will hit a peak very soon in Georgia (Fort Valley area), as well as South Carolina (primarily from shippers in an area south of Columbia).

San Joaquin Valley fruit – grossing about $6900 to Atlanta.

 

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Loading Opportunities from California to Arkansas, the Northwest and in Jersey

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DSCN3993Here’s a shipping update from various areas across the country, where there should be some loading opportunities.  Here’s also a cautionary note about some splitting of Oregon cherries due to recent rains.

California Tomato Shipments

Vine ripe tomato shipments from the Oceanside, CA area have started, with romas to get underway in August.  Both types of tomato shipments will continue through November.

Arkansas Tomato Shipments

A lot of tomato shipping areas around the country claim to ship home grown quality tomatoes, but consumers certainly know the difference. This season, there’s certainly an exception. Haul Produce is referring to vine ripe tomatoes from Arkansas. This beautiful, tasty product is currently being shipped from the Hermitage area and will continue through July.

Peach Shipments

New Jersey peach shipments get underway within the next week or so and should yield 30,000 tons to 35,000 tons of fruit from the state’s 5,500 acres of trees. Peach loadings will remain available through most of September.

Northwest Cherry Shipments

A monthly record of 10.3 million boxes of cherries were shipped from the region in June.   The volume was more than double the June 2012 tally of 4.7 million boxes — part of that year’s record crop….Rainfall in the last week of June has resulted in some splitting of Oregon cherries, but damage varied by grower. So use caution and pay attention to what is being loaded on your truck.  It could save you a claim or rejected load.  The amount of damage to cherries is estimated a about 10 percent of the fruit being lost.

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