Posts Tagged “Mexican mango imports”

Shipping Updates: California’s Gold Nugget Madarins, Mexican Mangoes and U.S. Produce Exports, Imports

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The ugly, but tasty Gold Nugget mandarin shipments are underway, while an increase in imports of Mexican mangoes are seen…Finally, here’s a glimpse at American’s imports and exports of fresh produce.A4

Mandarin Shipments

Gold Nugget mandarins are now being shippe by Bee Sweet Citrus  of Fowler, CA.through March.

Gold Nuggets, which will be shipped through March, have a bumpy exterior with a bright orange easy-peel rind and a sweet flavor..

Gold Nuggets are every citrus lover’s dream,” director of communications Monique Bienvenue said in a press release. “Not only are have they been voted to be one of the best-tasting mandarin varieties by a professional taste panel, they’re also easy-to-peel and are virtually seedless.”

The fruit is good for snacking, for salads or even for marmalade.

Mexican Mango Imports

Mexican mango imports by the U.S. began arriving about a month ago with ataulfo variety, arriving from the states of Chiapas, Oaxaca and Michoacán.  The forecast calls for volumes and quality are going to be much better than last year out of Southern Mexico.  About 29 million boxes of mangoes will be shipped through the week of May 19, an increase of 5 percent from the same period in 2017. The Mexican mango shipments are expected to continue growing in volume, driven in large part by increasing production in the Los Mochis area in northern Sinaloa.

Produce Imports and Exports

U.S. fresh fruit and vegetable exports will increase from $7 billion in 2016 to $8.5 billion in 2027, a gain of 21.4 percent over 10 years.  A much faster increase is seen for imports of fresh fruits and vegetables.  Imports of fresh produce will climb from $19.2 billion in 2016 to $32.1 billion in 2027, a gain of 68.9 percent over a decade.

“Growing consumer incomes, coupled with a demand for a wide variety of food, drives increases in U.S. agricultural imports over the projection period,” the USDA said, noting that the 4 percent annual growth in horticultural imports is largely driven by active fresh fruit and vegetable sales.

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Shipping Updates for California Kiwifruit; Mango imports; U.S. Apples

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DSCN0005The first shipping forecast for California kiwifruit has been issued, while we take a look at coming mango imports, and domestic apples loading opportunities.

California kiwifruit shipments are expected to be off only a little from a year ago when California growers produced 31,324 tons.  An initial forecast this season, which is called by some “conservative,” estimates there will 30,449 tons of kiwi.  About 98 percent of the U.S.-grown kiwifruit is produced in California.

Around 80 percent of of the crop is shipped to domestic markets, while some fruit exported, primarily to Mexico, Canada and Japan.

California kiwifruit shipments occur from late September until April

Western Fresh Marketing Services Inc.,  of Madera, CA. should start initial shipments the third or fourth week of September.

The Flavor Tree Fruit Co. LLC, Hanford, CA., will have 86 acres of gold kiwifruit grown under large tents this season as the company plans to ship about 50,000 cartons of gold kiwifruit from October until January and possibly February.

Mexican Mango Imports

Imported mangoes from Mexico should continue through September.  Light volumes of imported mangoes from Brazil are now arriving at U.S. ports.  Brazilian mango imports will peak in mid October and run until November, with a projected 7.8 million boxes.

Meanwhile, Through the week ending Aug. 12th, Mexico had shipped about 67.9 million boxes, up from about 66 million boxes through the same week in 2016.

 Apple Shipments

The U.S. Apple Association projects a 248.3 million carton crop for 2017-18, which would be 8 percent smaller than last year, but right on the 5-year average.

“There’s every reason to be optimistic about this year’s apple crop,” said Mark Nicholson, co-owner of Red Jacket Orchards, Geneva, N.Y.

The estimate is only 400,000 42-pound cartons lower than the USDA estimate from a few weeks ago.  The estimate came at the conclusion of the association’s annual Apple Crop Outlook and Marketing Conference, August 24-25 in Chicago.

The Washington crop is estimated at 159.5 million cartons, 1 percent higher than the 5-year average but 8 percent smaller than last season.  New York’s crop is estimated at 28 million cartons, 1 percent above the 5-year average and nearly the same as last year’s production.

 

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Imported Items Continue Arriving at Border Crossings, Ports

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DSCN5300While we tend to focus more on imported produce during the winter months when Southern Hemisphere fruits and vegetables are in good production, there is still a substantial amount of product crossing our borders or arriving at ports.

Mangos have become a major commodity over the past couple of decades in America and there currently are larger-than-normal volumes expected from Mexico during the second quarter of 2015.  Mexican mango imports will be approximately 36 million boxes during Q2 of 2015, which is about 10 percent more compared to approximately 33 million boxes of mangos imported during the same period from Mexico a year ago.

Additionally, Mexican mango imports in Q2 of 2015 are expected to be 3 percent higher than in 2013, which is the year that had the highest volume of Mexican mango imports on record.  The tropical fruit is crossing the border both at Nogales and in South Texas.

Peruvian Avocados

Peruvian avocado exporters expect to ship 204,000 tons of fruit for the 2015 season, an increase of more than 16,000 tons from the 2014 season.  Over 71,000 of those tons will be destined for the U.S. market, arriving primarily at East Coast ports.  Hass avocados will begin in late April, with production hitting its stride in the summer months and winding down in September.

Nogales Produce Shipments

Mexican imports through Nogales are past a peak for the year, but there is still substantial product, ranging from cucumbers to melons, squash and peppers.  The first Mexican grapes should start crossing the border any time now.

Lower Rio Grand Valley Produce

Mexican produce items crossing the border in South Texas range from watermelons to papayas.  Texas items range from sweet onions to citrus and cabbage.

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